LMB In The News


HIV Research Breakthroughs 2016

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Medical Daily includes work by the LMB’s Leo James’s group and University College London on improving antiviral drugs as one of its HIV research breakthroughs of 2016. More…

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New microscope lens: top ten breakthroughs

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Work by MRC funded Gail McConnell and LMB Emeritus, Brad Amos and colleagues at the University of Strathclyde have been selected for Physics World’s Top Ten Breakthroughs of 2016, for creating a new microscope lens that offers the unique combination of a large field of view with high resolution. Called a mesolens, the device allows a confocal microscope to create 3D images of much larger biological samples than was previously possible – while providing detail at the sub-cellular level. The development of the lens was initiated by Brad Amos at the LMB. More…

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Richard Pannell “wins science ‘Oscar’ for his life’s work”

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The Haverhill Echo celebrates local resident Richard Pannell’s MRC Lifetime Achievement CEO Award. Richard, who was nominated by his current supervisor, Andrew McKenzie, has worked at the LMB since 1980. More…

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Master of Trinity’s Bicycle worth up to $1 billion

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Bicycle Therapeutics, the Cambridge biotech company, has done a collaboration deal with AstraZeneca which puts it in line for up to $1 billion. Bicycle Therapeutics’ unique intellectual property is based on the work initiated at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge by the scientific founders of the company, Sir Gregory Winter (Master of Trinity College, Cambridge) and Prof Christian Heinis. Bicycle is pioneering a new class of drugs based on its bicyclic peptide platform, and will be working with AZ to spot and develop new treatments for respiratory, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. More…

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Richard Henderson wins prize at Carlsberg’s ‘Science to Business’ Forum

Richard Henderson, group leader at the LMB, has been awarded the Kaj Linderstrøm Lang Prize at Carlsberg’s ‘Science to Business’ Forum in recognition of his pioneering work towards obtaining high resolution atomic structures of membrane proteins and membrane protein complexes by cryo electron microscopy. More…

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Scientists are battling a drug-resistant pathogen which could prove fatal to patients with cystic fibrosis

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Andres Floto, group leader in the University of Cambridge Research Unit based in the LMB, talks to Cambridge TV about his discovery that multidrug resistant mycobacterial infections, which can be fatal for cystic fibrosis patients, can be transferred from patient to patient, and how this new insight has impacted the design of the cystic fibrosis clinic in the new Papworth Hospital. More…

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Art-meets-science performance preview on Cambridge TV

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The M.A.C. visited the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology to find out about an exciting collaborative performance between the institute’s scientists and the artists of 30 Bird and Public Works. More…

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Katja Röper: Deciphering tissue origami

Profile of LMB group leader Katja Röper and her work on how cytoskeletal behaviour controls tissue morphogenesis. More…

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New drug target for asthma

A new therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases such as asthma and autoimmune disorders has been identified by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. The researchers found that the PD-1 protein is a marker for developing Innate Lymphoid Cells that can trigger asthma.The LMB’s Andrew McKenzie is a author on the paper, and comments on this latest development. More…

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Microscopy: Imaging far and wide

A custom-built objective lens called the Mesolens allows relatively large biological specimens to be imaged with cellular resolution. It was developed by Brad Amos, LMB Emeritus scientist, and a team at the University of Strathclyde led by Professor Gail McConnell,along with lens designer Esmond Reid.  For the first time it becomes possible to see the whole picture. For example, a small tumour can be examined in its entirety but the images are sharp enough to see the internal structure of individual cells migrating out of the mass. Previously, this could only be seen in a tiny sub-region, so important details could be missed. More…

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