LMB In The News


Body clock drugs could ease psychiatric disorders and jet lag

“Researchers have successfully used a drug to reset and restart the natural 24 hour body clock of mice in the lab. The ability to do this in a mammal opens up the possibility of dealing with a range of human difficulties including some psychiatric disorders, jet lag and the health impacts of shift work. This work is led by Professor Andrew Loudon from the University of Manchester and Dr Mick Hastings of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, working with a multi-disciplinary team of scientists from Pfizer led by Dr Travis Wager, and is published August 24 in PNAS.” More…

Published

Body clock pills ‘could cure jet lag and manic depression’

“A team of British and American scientists have found a drug which can slow down, kick start and reset the body clocks of mice. It does this by altering a key enzyme which controls the process, called casein kinase 1… He [Prof Loudon] and Dr Mick Hastings of the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, worked with a team from Pfizer, the drugs company. Their findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, were funded by the MRC and the Biological Sciences Research Council (BBS RC).” More…

Published

Receptive receptors

“One route to developing new drugs is to look at targeting the hundreds of G-protein-coupled receptors that are not currently exploited clinically… Richard Henderson of the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK, an experienced researcher in membrane protein structure, describes them as ‘signalling molecules that control the whole of physiology.” More…

Published

Cambridge beats old rival in Workplace Cycle Challenge

“The latest manifestation of the age-old rivalry between Cambridge and Oxford has been won by the light blues. Both cities ran Workplace Cycle Challenges between 7 and 27 June but it was Cambridge that managed to persuade more people onto their bikes, with 132 new cyclists compared to Oxford’s 117… The top teams in Cambridge were the Medical Research Council’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology, the British Antarctic Survey, the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre, IUCN, Cambridge Mechatronics, Hinxton Hall finance department, and The Wellcome Trust.” More…

Published

Cambridge road to be named after legendary scientist

“The road leading to a new laboratory will be named after renowned scientist Dr Francis Crick… Hugh Pelham, the director of the Laboratory for Molecular Biology, explained how the decision came about. He said: “There is a road naming committee featuring representatives of the hospital and the MRC who look into these kind of things, and there is a tradition of naming new roads after people with connections to the site. Because this road leads to the new laboratory, we wanted someone really prestigious, and what better choice than Francis,” he added.” More…

Published

Section of access road to be named after DNA scientist

“A road leading to a new £200 million Cambridge laboratory is to be named after legendary scientist Francis Crick. Francis Crick Avenue will run through the Cambridge Biomedical Campus on the Addenbrooke’s Hospital site to the new Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB), which is due to open in 2012.” More…

Published

Giant new lens shows minutest of cells

“Scientists have come up with a giant-lensed microscope to allow them to see the minutest of cells. The “Mesolens” microscope is described as revolutionary because of how it could transform laboratory researchers’ ability to look at living cells. They will now be able to see them at a level never seen before, the scientists say. The team of Medical Research Council scientists, led by Dr William Amos [LMB] developed the microscope in response to a growing research need to examine larger and larger tissue samples, in particular early stage genetically modified mouse embryos.” More…

Published

Giant ‘Mesolens’ observes in incredible detail

“Once, microscopes were simple. If you wanted to examine something, you’d kill it, chop it into slices, then stick the slice that you’re interested in under the microscope. Today, however, microscopes are rather more complex — and don’t require the subject to be sliced open before they can be examined. Instead, you just focus the microscope on the exact depth that you’re interested in, using what’s called a Confocal microscope. The way it works is that focus the lens on one tiny spot, using extreme depth of field to blur out the layers you don’t need. You see clearly the layer that interests you, and other layers aren’t visible. This approach was pioneered in the mid-80s by the Medical Research Council’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB) in Cambridge, and is now widely in use across the world…” More…

Published

One decade on: Sequencing the Human Genome

“Tomorrow marks the 10 year anniversary of sequencing the human genome. Decades of Medical Research Council (MRC) research into DNA and the human genome have led to the development of technologies such as DNA sequencing, fingerprint and chip technology. MRC researchers [including some from LMB] have played a leading role in all stages of the journey in DNA research and its outcomes for society. Building on the expertise of scientists based at its units, the MRC aims to further the understanding of links between genetics and disease.” More…

Published

The microscope that can see a flea’s beating heart

“The best of the UK’s cutting-edge science, engineering and technology are on display at London’s Southbank Centre as the Royal Society opens its summer science festival. One of the exhibits on display is a giant lens microscope which allows scientists to examine specimens at multiple levels of focus. It can show the crusty skin of a water flea, then zoom in to its beating heart and swivelling eye, and then deeper still to individual cells.” More…

Published