LMB In The News


LMB scientists in Cambridge honoured

“Two MRC LMB scientists in Cambridge have received top honours. Sean Munro has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society, and Andrew McKenzie has been elected as a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.” More…

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Cambridge Biomedical Campus may expand again

“The discussion took place over dinner served in the canteen of the Laboratory of Molecular Biology which has played host to a long list of illustrious diners over the years including the nine Nobel Laureates associated with the Laboratory.” More…

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John Sulston and the Human Genome Project

“A profile of the work of John Sulston, from sequencing work at LMB on the genome of the Nematode worm to the Human Genome Project at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.” More…

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Genetic defect that triggers blood cancers found

“In research led by Alan Warren’s group, a defect which triggers blood cancers has been identified.” More…

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Andrew Carter: Dynein Trailblazer

“Profile of LMB group leader Andrew Carter and his work on the motor protein dyne in.” More…

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Eureka Moments: making proteins, making a difference

“In the second of the Biochemical Society’s video interviews with our Honorary Members, Michael Neuberger and Brian Hartley talk to Sir Greg Winter about his role as a pioneer of therapeutic antibodies.” More…

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No DNA needed, RNA goes solo

“Philipp Holliger and his co-workers at LMB have engineered an RNA enzyme to synthesize another active RNA enzyme from an RNA template. This models one theory for how life originated on Earth: with RNA molecules that both encoded genetic information and catalysed reactions to express that information.” More…

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Biologists create one of life’s first enzymes

“tC19Z, synthesised in Phil Holliger’s lab at LMB, could be a version of one of the first enzymes that ever existed on our planet – and a clue to how life itself got started.” More…

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Heptares Therapeutics helps push GPCR drug discovery forward

Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN)

“G-protein-coupled receptors are hot drug targets, and plenty of companies want to know what they look like to get an edge on making new drugs. Despite recent advances, getting X-ray crystal structures for GPCRs is still far from easy. Heptares Therapeutics, joins a trio of firms in licensing their structure-determining technology and partnering with large drugmakers to help push GPCR drug discovery forward. Heptares Therapeutics obtains GPCR X-ray structures with help from thermal stabilization – a targeted mutation technique developed by Chris Tate and Richard Henderson at LMB.” More…

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Max Perutz: his life and legacy

“LMB scientists take part in a round-table discussion about Max Perutz.” More…

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