LMB Named Lectures

Periodically the LMB hosts an “LMB Named Lecture”, given by eminent scientists from around the world. These LMB Named Lectures are advertised widely throughout the local area and are open to all.


The lecture is named in honour of the LMB Nobel Laureate Max Perutz.

Max Perutz arrived at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge in 1936, to work in the field of X-ray crystallography. This move would lead to him becoming a pioneer in the new field of molecular biology, co-founding a world-class research laboratory and developing a technique to unlock the structures of proteins. Max played a key role in the history of the LMB. He was Director of the ‘MRC Unit for Research on the Molecular Structure of Biological Systems’ when it was established in 1947; and when the unit became the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB) in 1962, he became its first Chairman. Max Perutz officially retired as Chairman of the LMB in 1979, having overseen the development of the MRC unit into a first class research laboratory. He died in Cambridge on 6 February 2002, aged 87.

2015 Max Perutz Lecture on Thursday 2nd June 2015 by Ron Vale
2014 Max Perutz Lecture on Friday 5th December 2014 by Gary Ruvkun
2013 Max Perutz Lecture on Tuesday 30th April 2013 by Professor Ari Helenius
2012 Max Perutz Lecture on Thursday 13th September 2012 by Steve West

 


The lecture is named in honour of LMB Nobel Laureate Francis Crick.

Francis was born in 1916 in Northampton. He studied physics at University College London. His PhD work was interrupted by World War II, during which he worked on the design of acoustic and magnetic mines for the British Admiralty. In 1949 he joined Max Perutz’s MRC Unit in Cambridge. It was here that he helped solve the structure of DNA and initiated work on the genetic code. In 1976 he moved to the Salk Institute, California. He immersed himself in trying to define how we are aware of things – consciousness. He continued with this until he died, defining the important goal of trying to find a neuronal correlate of consciousness. He died in San Diego on 28 July 2004.

2016 Francis Crick Lecture on Tuesday 16th February 2016 by Adrian Bird
2015 Francis Crick Lecture on Friday 2nd October 2015 by Emmanuelle Charpentier
2014 Francis Crick Lecture on Friday 19th September 2014 by Stephen J. Elledge
2013 Francis Crick Lecture on Friday 11th April 2014 by Stanley B. Prusiner

2012 Francis Crick Lecture on Wednesday 15th February 2012 by Angelika Amon
2011 Francis Crick Lecture on Friday 9th September 2011 by David Anderson


The lecture is named in honour of the LMB Nobel Laureate César Milstein.

César was born in Argentina in 1927. After completing PhDs in both Buenos Aires and Cambridge, and a brief spell of research back in Argentina, he joined the LMB in 1963 and spent the rest of his life here. He developed an early interest in immunology, and his research concentrated on antibody structure and diversity. In the early 1970’s he and his post-doc Georges Köhler developed the technique to produce monoclonal antibodies, for which they were jointly awarded the 1984 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. This technique has been used for diagnostics and developed further by LMB colleagues for therapeutic applications, leading to the creation of several MRC spin-out companies. César continued his research on how somatic mutation arises in immunoglobulin genes. He died in Cambridge on 24 March 2002

2017 César Milstein Lecture on Thursday 9th February 2017 by Thomas Südhof
2016 César Milstein Lecture on Friday 9th September 2016 by Yoshinori Ohsumi
2015 César Milstein Lecture on Monday 14th December 2015 by Lewis Cantley
2014 César Milstein Lecture on Monday 30th June 2014 by Peter Walter
2013 César Milstein Lecture on Thursday 26th September 2013 by Scott Emr
2012 César Milstein Lecture on Thursday 17th May 2012 by Bruce Beutler
2011 César Milstein Lecture on Thursday 7th April 2011 by Tom Rapoport


The John Kendrew Lecture is named in honour of LMB Nobel Laureate John Kendrew.

John Kendrew was born in Oxford on 24th March, 1917. He studied chemistry at Trinity College, Cambridge and graduated in 1939. During World War II he worked on radar for the Air Ministry Research Establishment. In 1946 he returned to Cambridge and joined Max Perutz at the MRC ‘Unit for Research on the Molecular Structure of Biological Systems’ (now the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology) where his research focused on protein structure and the X-ray analysis of myoglobin. In the 1960’s John jointly founded the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) and helped create and was first Director of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). He also founded and was Editor in Chief of the Journal of Molecular Biology. From 1981-1987 he was President of St John’s College, Oxford. He died in Cambridge on 23rd August 1997.

2016 John Kendrew Lecture on Friday 24th October 2016 by Bonnie Bassler
2015 John Kendrew Lecture on Friday 25th May 2016 by Tony Hunter
2014 John Kendrew Lecture on Friday 25th March 2014 by Michael Levitt
2013 John Kendrew Lecture on Friday 1st November 2013 by Joan Steitz
2012 John Kendrew Lecture on Tuesday 3rd April 2012 by David Drubin